Man Murders 77, No Death Penalty

A man in Norway (photo above) murdered 77 people with a bombing and a shooting spree.  A terrorist act of these proportions would receive the death penalty in the United States.  However, in Norway, there is no death penalty.  In fact, there prison system is majorly based on rehabilitation.  Anders Breivik will serve 21 years in a Norwegian prison (shown below) for his crimes.

He will not be released for a few decades, because his release is dependent on how much of a threat he poses to the public.  It will take a long time to convince the Norwegian government that is fit to be a member of society again.  Shouldn’t he be put to death for his crimes?  I do not want to get into an argument about retributive justice, but I think it is important to discuss people that are too dangerous to keep alive.  A common response to this notion is life without the possibility of parole.  This is an option but does not always work.  We have to consider the safety of the public as well as the safety of other prisoners.  Solitary confinement or private cells is an additional option.  Stanley “Tookie” Williams found a way around his private confinement.  Williams was placed in solitary confinement because he was causing problems with the general population of inmates.  Somehow, he was still able to call out hits from within his padded cell.  He was eventually put to death in 2005.  Leaving someone like Williams or Breivik alive is not the solution.

Advocates on either side of the capital punishment debate need to agree that some people deserve to die.  Mass murderers and serial killers who thrive on spreading fear and violence have no purpose and no right to be part of society.  We need some way to make sure these types of people do not impact our lives.  The only way to keep the public safe from monsters is to eliminate them.  It is not a good option to limit the ways in which the judicial system can prosecute the criminals that spread fear and pain to the public.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10000872396390444812704577608672475346042.html

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2 thoughts on “Man Murders 77, No Death Penalty

  1. Although it seems right to convict those that are said to be most dangerous, the death penalty would unfortunately be an option for the general pool of criminals who meet the requirements to be sentenced. I believe it is important to consider the fact that if the death penalty was allowed on a regular basis, many innocent people could also lose their lives from being wrongly identified.

    I also believe that due to the crime committed by that individual, isn’t it only fair to allow them the punishment they deserve rather than being allowed a copout? Why not allow them to experience pain, violence or fear the way they may have sprung on their victim(s) rather than solely taking their lives?

    I understand where you are coming from because there are some extremely dangerous inmates that even affect people outside the walls of their prison. Do you believe there is a middle ground or can there ever be certain qualifications, solely for the most dangerous of inmates?

  2. Going off of what Shelby is saying many innocent lives will be at risk for wrong identity. What comes to mind is in addition to tainted evidence that can “prove” an innocent person guilty is the confession. Here in the United States the suspects can be interrogated for hours with mind game to have them confess. There have been examples where people that did not do the crime actually confessed to doing it because the interrogator actually convinced the they did it. So even with “evidence” and a confession you can be killing an innocent person. So you can never really be 100% sure.
    I also agree the corporate should should go through what they put their victim through but once again that is impossible. Maybe in the future as in Star Trek once found guilty they have to relive the victim experience every day through their eyes.

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